Every coin counts

FRANCIS EMUKULE I am always fascinated by the way money figures are spelt. The more puzzling are the large sums, and I do not understand why Shs2 million would for example be concluded with the word “only”! To me this is a lot of money. Why should someone say it is “only” Shs2 million? I mean, we are talking millions here! The penny dropped,  however, the day when I realized that every coin counts, no pun intended. One day when I went to town to buy some stuff and I…

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I Love You! 1 Samuel 18:1-5

John Senyonyi A story is told about a group of people that were invited by the king for a luncheon at the palace. Upon their arrival, they were ushered into the dining room, which had very wide tables. A lot of appetite and arresting aroma characterized the scent in the dining room. The master of ceremonies called everyone to order and gave eating instructions. No one was allowed to use their hands to eat. So guests were given forks that had very long handles covering almost the vertical length of…

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Staying empowered during your job search

  Becoming despondent during a job search is extremely common. Whether you are out of a job because you just graduated, you are looking for greener pastures, or you were let go – it is difficult to feel you are making headway. With the job market becoming increasingly competitive, it is important to keep yourself positive and productive during the transition phase. A study by Connie Wanberg, Associate Dean at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, highlighted the low felt immediately after ending a job. Over the first…

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The power of audacious faith

In October 2016, Mitch Shalom’s life took a totally unexpected twist when she was involved in a road accident that claimed the lives of two people. She survived narrowly,  and was left for dead in the trench she landed in when a saloon car knocked the bodaboda she was on. She sustained five cracks on her skull, one stretching up to the ear! Together with her family and friends, they narrated her miraculous recovery to Francis Emukule. The shocker “On Tuesday at 3:15 pm I received a call informing me…

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Odongtho’s tale of lessons in the media

    FRANCIS EMUKULE A discussion about the Ugandan media on the  political scene would be incomplete without mention of CHARLES ODONGTHO, the host of the Frontline, a political talk show on NBS TV. The third child in a family of eight children, who has grown through the ranks to become a force to  reckoned with, recently talked to The  Standard. I have been a journalist for 19 years now since I started practicing in 1999. My first story was broadcast on 13 March over Radio Paidah, a radio station…

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The P7 dropout who got a degree

  FRANCIS EMUKULE Nelson Henry Nsubuga was abandoned at the age of six, following the divorce of his father George William Miiro, now 82, from his mother Victoria Nakabiri, now 71. “This negatively impacted on me. My mother gave birth to me when she was only 15; and when they divorced I did not see her again, for nine years.” “Due to this split I was not able to attain an adequate education. At the age of ten I joined Primary One with the support of my grandmother who educated…

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Think tanks are vital for Africa’s growth and thought process

NICHOLAS  OPOLOT Recently, Uganda Christian University unveiled one of its first public think tanks, the Africa Policy Centre (APC). This is of great importance to this nation since think tanks such as APC serve a critical role as knowledge centres. Today many think tanks suffer from extinction with Uganda accounting for only 27 of them across the country. Why are they dying out? Are we maximizing their full potential? Do we understand what think tanks mean to our future? Dr.  James Magara – a leading philosopher on think tanks adds…

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A city worthy coming back to

Mutto (third right) and a group of friends meet at Fort Jesus Mombasa

5th June 2018 – Three things strike me when I arrive in Nairobi; First, the hustle, as in business and huge billboards and a heart of commerce. I’m also struck by the traffic and rust-colored dust, making breathing difficult. And there’s no escaping the chasm between wealth and poverty, between the manicured lawns of Karen and Muthaiga and, a world away, the rutted tracks and refuse of Mathare and Kibera, the city’s two largest slums. Wealth disparity isn’t Nairobi’s only contradiction. Visually, the city is unusual: a huge national park…

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Drugs that poison our neighbourhood

  BY TEZRA KISAKYE Elias Mugabe, a resident of Kawuga-Mukono, spends the better part of his day chewing mairungi- a common narcotic drug leaf. For the last five years, mairungi, internationally known as khat, has been his breakfast because it helps him beat hunger and stay awake. Indeed, looking beneath his ripped, pale blue jeans, I see a bunch of the leaves ready for chewing. Drug users display signs of increased alertness, excitement, energy, talkativeness, decreased appetite and difficulty in sleeping. Health expert Henry Mukiibi from Serenity rehabilitation centre believes…

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Living with bipolar affective disorder

TEZRA KISAKYE Every man, woman, and child who struggles with bipolar disorder struggles in a different way. I talked to a few people who have bipolar and one oft-repeated lament stands out: “I come from a nice family. I wasn’t brought up to be like this.” Many are dispirited and at a loss to understand or control their own behaviour. Judgment and stigma then spew from the rest- who is this man who treats his wife so shabbily? How did this once upstanding citizen turn into a petty, compulsive shoplifter?…

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