University staff arrested, charged over food theft

Some of the stolen chicken

BY DOUGLAS OLUM At least three members of staff of Uganda Christian University (UCU) have been arrested and charged with theft. The trio, who are casual labourers at the dining hall, are: Emmanuel Mwesigwa (cook), Juma Kyaterekera (netball coach and former kitchen staff) and Joseph Banamwita (kitchen mini-store keeper). According to security sources, Mwesigwa, Kyaterekera and Mathias Emillo were found in illegal possession of a 50-kilo bag of rice, a 20-litre jerrycan of cooking oil and 12 dressed chicken. The items are suspected to have been stolen from the kitchen…

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School of Medicine tasked with ethics

As Uganda Christian University (UCU) launched its new School of Medicine recently, it has been tasked to produce doctors with ethics and integrity. The Prime Minister, Dr Ruhakana Rugunda, made this call during the School launch on Friday September 14 at the Archbishop’s Gardens in Namirembe. Rugunda revealed that many universities were graduating medical doctors every year, but that the questions of ethics and integrity remain a big challenge. “In spite of the huge number of medical doctors we are already producing, Uganda is still greatly underserved in terms of medical doctors and not just in terms of numbers. We need professionals with integrity and ethics. We hope the doctors who will come from this institution will be those with a high level of professionalism, integrity and ethics,” Rugunda said. He added, “We hope they will be professionals who put patients first. We hope the doctors will not only excel in service delivery but also research.” The Premier’s advice comes at the backdrop of the University Council’s resolution adopting professionalism and character as the institution’s niche. Professionalism in this case entails appearance, demeanour and mindset. Rugunda also noted that while Uganda was making good progress in the health sector, there was a huge challenge of non-communicable diseases among Ugandans. He, therefore, urged the public to observe strict health practices like washing hands after visiting the toilets to prevent diseases. Speaking at the same event, the Minister of Health, Dr Ruth Aceng, echoed the call for ethics and professionalism among the students, saying there is a huge problem of attitude among Ugandan medical workers. Dr Aceng said while many medical doctors are already being produced at the first degree level by universities across the country, the UCU School of Medicine should not only focus on educating doctors at the Bachelor’s degree level but also on having more specialists in the various areas of specialty. Her call follows a recent revelation by the State Minister of Health in charge of General Duties, Sarah Opendi, who told legislators during a plenary sitting that Government was struggling to attract and retain specialists in various disciplines because of the meagre pay offered to them. While addressing journalists prior to the event, the UCU Vice Chancellor, Dr John Senyonyi, said Ugandans were not receiving enough medical attention due to the scarcity of doctors. He said the establishment of the School of Medicine was a partial search to address the problem. Dr Senyonyi also said the School hopes to venture into locally based research in the near future to counter the continuous reliance of Ugandan medical practitioners on imported health care guidelines as a way of improving health care in the country. Asked whether the School of Medicine was ready to meet the great public expectations, Dr Edward Kanyesigye, the pioneer Dean of the School, told The Standard that they are equal to the task. “We are very prepared. We selected very qualified students; we have very qualified staff both in the academia and medical practice. I think our biggest strength is on the staffing. We have up to 17 consultants as part-timers already seeing our students twice in a week, something other universities only begin to do when their students are already in third-year,” Dr Kanyesigye said. Furthermore, he emphasized that the school stands a higher chance of producing the desired quality of graduates because “God is on our side.” Background of the School The UCU School of Medicine is an extension of the former Faculty of Health Sciences. It was founded in collaboration with Mengo Hospital which is the teaching hospital and accredited by the National Council for Higher Education (NCHE) in March this year. A total of 62 pioneer students have been enrolled to study the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, and the Bachelor of Dental Surgery, respectively. Mengo Hospital Medical Director, Dr Rose Mutumba, said they are proud to offer the training site for the School. She said the Hospital was ready to employ its 122 years of experience in health service delivery to train the doctors. Dr Mutumba asked the students to learn ethics, professionalism and character which are very essential in the medical profession and practice. She also urged them to respect the nurses at the facility because they have valuable experience which is very resourceful to the learners. In his speech, the UCU Chancellor and Anglican Archbishop of Uganda, Stanley Ntagali, said the extended footprint of the university in educating students call for greater outreach. Ntagali said the establishment of the School of Medicine is a partial fulfilment of the desire to inch further into the world. He also said because most people come into the world and depart in the hands of health workers, good training of medical personnel is an essential part of Christian institutions like UCU.

By Douglas Olum As Uganda Christian University (UCU) launched its new School of Medicine recently, it has been tasked to produce doctors with ethics and integrity. The Prime Minister, Dr Ruhakana Rugunda,  made this call during the School launch onFriday September 14 at the Archbishop’s Gardens in Namirembe. Rugunda revealed that many universities were graduating medical doctors every year, but that the questions of ethics and integrity remain a big challenge. “In spite of the huge number of medical doctors we are already producing, Uganda is still greatly underserved in terms of…

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Mbabazi makes bucks in bricks

Mbabazi sharon making bricks

Francis Emukule Sharon Mbabazi is the new talk of campus and the nation although not like Bad Black (the slay queen).  Mababazi has become famous for laying bricks. Brick laying in Uganda is a men’s job. The third child in a family of five, Mbabazi comes from Masooli village in Gayaza Division. She has been laying bricks for the last eight years to meet her school dues and other needs. This job has earned her not only fame but she takes pride in the mud from which she mints money.…

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Every coin counts

FRANCIS EMUKULE I am always fascinated by the way money figures are spelt. The more puzzling are the large sums, and I do not understand why Shs2 million would for example be concluded with the word “only”! To me this is a lot of money. Why should someone say it is “only” Shs2 million? I mean, we are talking millions here! The penny dropped,  however, the day when I realized that every coin counts, no pun intended. One day when I went to town to buy some stuff and I…

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I Love You! 1 Samuel 18:1-5

John Senyonyi A story is told about a group of people that were invited by the king for a luncheon at the palace. Upon their arrival, they were ushered into the dining room, which had very wide tables. A lot of appetite and arresting aroma characterized the scent in the dining room. The master of ceremonies called everyone to order and gave eating instructions. No one was allowed to use their hands to eat. So guests were given forks that had very long handles covering almost the vertical length of…

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Staying empowered during your job search

  Becoming despondent during a job search is extremely common. Whether you are out of a job because you just graduated, you are looking for greener pastures, or you were let go – it is difficult to feel you are making headway. With the job market becoming increasingly competitive, it is important to keep yourself positive and productive during the transition phase. A study by Connie Wanberg, Associate Dean at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, highlighted the low felt immediately after ending a job. Over the first…

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The power of audacious faith

In October 2016, Mitch Shalom’s life took a totally unexpected twist when she was involved in a road accident that claimed the lives of two people. She survived narrowly,  and was left for dead in the trench she landed in when a saloon car knocked the bodaboda she was on. She sustained five cracks on her skull, one stretching up to the ear! Together with her family and friends, they narrated her miraculous recovery to Francis Emukule. The shocker “On Tuesday at 3:15 pm I received a call informing me…

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Odongtho’s tale of lessons in the media

    FRANCIS EMUKULE A discussion about the Ugandan media on the  political scene would be incomplete without mention of CHARLES ODONGTHO, the host of the Frontline, a political talk show on NBS TV. The third child in a family of eight children, who has grown through the ranks to become a force to  reckoned with, recently talked to The  Standard. I have been a journalist for 19 years now since I started practicing in 1999. My first story was broadcast on 13 March over Radio Paidah, a radio station…

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The P7 dropout who got a degree

  FRANCIS EMUKULE Nelson Henry Nsubuga was abandoned at the age of six, following the divorce of his father George William Miiro, now 82, from his mother Victoria Nakabiri, now 71. “This negatively impacted on me. My mother gave birth to me when she was only 15; and when they divorced I did not see her again, for nine years.” “Due to this split I was not able to attain an adequate education. At the age of ten I joined Primary One with the support of my grandmother who educated…

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Think tanks are vital for Africa’s growth and thought process

NICHOLAS  OPOLOT Recently, Uganda Christian University unveiled one of its first public think tanks, the Africa Policy Centre (APC). This is of great importance to this nation since think tanks such as APC serve a critical role as knowledge centres. Today many think tanks suffer from extinction with Uganda accounting for only 27 of them across the country. Why are they dying out? Are we maximizing their full potential? Do we understand what think tanks mean to our future? Dr.  James Magara – a leading philosopher on think tanks adds…

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