A childhood dream lived

Wandera addressing an audience at the Commonwealth of Kentucky

MBY DENNIS WANDERA My journalism passion stems from childhood. If you remember kids in your high school who used to read “news” at the school assembly and publish manila weekly “newspapers,” that was me. More than anything, it was my boyhood career calling. This eventually earned me the information prefect post for three years in a row in high school, and student editor of the school magazine. My journalism dream got a boost when my older sister Constance, who was then a student at UCU would bring me copies of…

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Blending in peacefully

DOREEN KAJERU

BY DOREEN KAJERU When we are born, we are without knowledge about anything. We are trained, taught and moulded by parents and the different surroundings we are subjected to in the growth path of our lives. Unfortunately, sometimes we get acquainted with bad habits that later on grow into character. It may not be a parent’s wish for their children to grow up the way they themselves grew up but their actions, which the children watch each day, are louder than words. They look up to parents because they are their…

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Down syndrome is still a health threat

An illustration showing the signs of Down Syndrome (Internet Photo)

BY ELIZABETH AMONGIN Alvin Mukisa was born a normal baby like any other, but soon his mother, Achiro, noticed that her son was lazy and had wide eyes. The mother decided to take him to the paediatrician who carried out various tests and said that he had Down syndrome. Down Syndrome was first described as a disorder in 1866 and it was named after John Langdon, who later discovered the cause of the defect in 1959. The World Health Organisation defines Down syndrome as a condition caused by extra-genetic material…

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How The Standard taught me about journalism basics

Oyako during the interview (Photo by Elizabeth Amongin)

BY STAFF WRITER It is a common practice for many people to despise humble beginnings (first place of work) after gaining more income and popularity. Many do not want to be recognised as former employees of particular institutions or companies due to various reasons. But for journalist Arthur Oyako, despising one’s humble beginnings has never crossed his mind. Oyako was first employed at The Standard for two years. While at The Standard, he worked as a photographer, editor, writer among others. At this time, the newspaper was only three years…

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Shisha, the silent killer

(Photo by Patrick Massa)

BY AGATHA MUHAISE It is a chilly Friday night at the famous Casablanca II nightclub in Mukono town. Files of youths make their way to the little, black, ramshackle gate that we will later realise is the entrance to club. We are ushered in by a mean-looking man, who barely makes an effort to check us, into a crowded compound of what looks like a poorly lit residential house. The Music is blaring and deafening, drowning out random screams and loud conversation. We squeeze our way to the back of the…

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How working at The Standard re-shaped my thinking

(Internet Photo)

By Elizabeth Amongin Who is Frank Obonyo? I was born in Nagongera, Tororo District, to Johnny and Betty Obonyo. I went to school in Luzira Primary School, Kisoko High School, Luzira Secondary School, then Uganda Christian University, Mukono, where I graduated with a BA in Mass Communication majoring in Print. How did you join The Standard ? After     graduation in 2006, the idea of starting up a student community newspaper was hatched by the then head of department. We were interviewed and appointed as staff writers in March…

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Writing one’s way to the top

(Photo by Patrick Massa)

By Elizabeth   Amongin While undertaking his A-level studies at Mengo Senior School, Semakula decided to pursue journalism in spite of not having studied literature. “I joined UCU in 2003 to study Mass Communication thinking my class had only former literature students. But during the lectures I discovered that we were all the same and not everyone had done literature,” he said. The ambitious Semakula made his friends wisely. While at university in second year, he met one Samuel Waigolo, who was at that time writing for Daily Monitor and…

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Why January semester is bad news to business

Stalls without clients in the recent January bazaar (File photo)

BY STAFF WRITER It is the Easter (January) Semester and  the majority of the university students are not on session. Students in the faculties of Education and Arts, Law, Science and Technology, and Health sciences are not on campus. Those who are off-session are thankful that they will have to rest for the next four months. They are happy that they will have time to make some pocket money for their next semester. This situation is however  bad news for the business owners in and around the Mukono campus, because…

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Resilience in the face of economic hardships

(Stuart M)

BY RICHARD SEBAGGALA Statistics from the Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) show that Uganda’s economy is losing ground. The year 2016 ended on a gloomy note for most people as a result of numerous economic hardships like the depreciation of the shilling, the rising cost of living, inadequate rainfall, among other socio-economic challenges. There is a general feeling among many that money is scarce and most people are worried about the future. As a result there is a recurrent discussion of how the year 2017 will be and how best many…

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Who determines your worth?

BY DOREEN KAJERU Life as people know it can get quite challenging, tough and absolutely mind-boggling! It presents to us with many situations, many of which are curve balls leading us to crossroads we never knew existed. The common proverb, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going,” must have been derived after a face-off with someone’s hurdles in life. Do these situations make us forget our worth as we drown in the sorrows of life? I was listening to a sermon recently and the preacher, in one sentence,…

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